Revesby Workers Club History On Display


Revesby Workers Club History On Display

Revesby Workers’ Club club history display showcasing the story and progress of the club over the last fifty plus years for all members and guests to appreciate.

The history of Revesby Workers’ Club spans more than fifty years and shares a prominent story of new development, transformation and remarkable milestones. The unveiling of the new history display shares the clubs’ story through old photographs, wooden carvings and a timeline of the years gone by, and space for the years ahead.

The new history display is located inside the entrance of the lower level of the Club opposite Hair Necessities. The vision behind the display is to portray the history of the Club in a timelines fashion highlighting the growth and accomplishments of Revesby Workers’ Club over the years.

Revesby Workers’ Club CEO Ed Camilleri says that the new history display has given members an insight into the great history of the club.

“As the club has expanded and diversified so much over the years it is important to make the connection with the Clubs foundation and history, it brings the old and the new together.” he said.

“Many members have taken the time to enjoy the visual displays and comments, in particular, Gough Whitlams involvement with the Club which has re-surfaced many good memories and created a new talking point.”

The History of the Club

Revesby Workers’ Club was formed during a time of great development and changed within the Revesby and Bankstown community. The decision to establish the Club was made by a group of hardy, persistent men who had generous spirit and strong family commitment, not a Labor Club, but, more succinctly workers’ club, a club with a vision to embrace women, as much as it would embrace men folk.

The original club premises opened on September 12, 1962 with a total of 235 members. The ‘Big Club’, as it was christened across the road officially opened on August 18, 1973 by the then-Prime Minister Gough Whitlam who would enjoy a long and rewarding relationship with the Club.

The story of Revesby Workers’ Club is like no other in Australian licensed club history. It is a club that has worn its heart on its rolled-up sleeves – no beg pardons, no denial of a sometimes turbulent history, yet with an integrity and soul that continues to invoke the Revesby message.

The Revesby Workers’ Club Logo 

The Revesby Workers’ Club logo and its origins and genesis have very little on record, almost as though nobody wanted to claim it. The background is simple. The hammer and the wrench represent the workingmen’s tools, an understandable selection reflecting the traditions of the Club.

Along with the addition of the new history display is the Directors and Secretary History wall that is located in the foyer of the Boardroom. While this display is not open to the public it is a very important addition that shows the management team that shaped great change within the history of the club.



For the future, to celebrate the clubs rich history members and guests can hold onto the records of the Revesby Workers’ Club history through Gary Lester’s book, True to Our Traditions.

Gary Lester’s history of Revesby Workers’ Club tells of the colourful fifty year journey. From its humble beginnings, Revesby Workers’ Club has achieved great status as one of the country’s most prominent and successful clubs.

Gary Lester has been commissioned to update the True to our Traditions history book, capturing the last three years of the Clubs development.  This will notably be in an online format so that future editions can be easily updated.

At present, the True To Our Traditions can be purchases from the Club reception – Special discount price $20 (retail value $70).

All proceeds from sales of the book go directly to the Asbestos Diseases Foundation of Australia (ADFA).

Our Chefs Triumph Again


Our Chefs Triumph Again

A big congratulation to our Executive Chef, Hung Le and Chef de Partie Daniella Digby who won Chefs Table for a second time proving that Revesby Workers’ Club has the best club food in NSW.

The Chef’s Table competition was created by ClubsNSW to award and recognise the many talented chefs, cooks and apprentices in NSW clubs. It has provided a unique opportunity for the chefs at Revesby Workers’ Club and Mooney Mooney Club to showcase their culinary talents and the club’s dining venue.

The Chefs Table awards night was hosted by Hung and Daniella at Revesby Workers’ Club where they plated hundreds of meals for representatives and guests from their winning 2014 three course menu.

For 2015, their winning dishes consisted of house brined scallops, brandade, rosemary crisp, and endive salad and lemon oil for entrée followed by seared free-range duck breast, potato pillow, apricot purée, glazed apricots, toasted hazelnuts and amaretto sauce. For dessert, dark chocolate sphere, peanut butter cream, peanut crumble with warm rosemary and vanilla toffee sauce.

Executive Chef Hung Le says the competition and the awards have helped Revesby Workers’ Club stand out while the club restaurant, Bel Cibo, remains as busy as ever.

“This year the competition has been tough and we have had to come up against other clubs who have a lot of talented chefs. For us at the club, winning Chef’s Table for the second time in a row is a huge achievement and there is no doubt that clubs now offer even better food and better service.” Hung said.

Chef’s table head judge Julio Azzarello says this year’s competition was of the highest calibre with Revesby Workers’ Club producing a very high class menu.

“It was the intense and thoughtful level of food complexity shown by Hung and Daniella that had us all convinced the duo from Revesby was not resting on their laurels.”

The award winning restaurant, Bel Cibo at Revesby Workers’ Club is open Wednesday Thursday from 5.30pm to 9.30pm, Friday 12pm to 9.30pm and Saturday 5.30 to 9.30pm. Reservations are essential.

Note: Bel Cibo will be closed on Saturday 26 December 2015 (Boxing Day). In 2016 Bel Cibo will no longer trade on Friday’s for lunch.